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Florida 'Fixer-Upper' On Sale For $75 Million

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Florida 'Fixer-Upper' On Sale For $75 Million

Business

Florida 'Fixer-Upper' On Sale For $75 Million

Florida 'Fixer-Upper' On Sale For $75 Million

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128024418/128024391" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The housing market has been tough on David Siegel. The timeshare mogul had to abandon construction of the house he was building for his family in Windermere, Fla. It's on the market for $75 million. The half-built home is based on the French palace Versailles.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is fixer-upper for sale.

The housing market has been tough on David Siegel. The real estate mogul had to abandon construction of the house he was building last year for his family in Windermere, Florida. It is now on the market for $75 million. It's a half-built home - $75 million based on the French palace Versailles. It has 13 bedrooms -13, a 6,000 square foot master suite and 23 bathrooms. There's a stained glass dome in the main hall, a 20-car garage, you get the idea.

It is not the most expensive home on the market right now, believe it or not. But at 90,000 square feet, it is apparently the largest. Inquiries have come in, according to the Wall Street Journal, from Russia and the Middle East.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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