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Letters: Jim Thorpe; The New iPhone

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Letters: Jim Thorpe; The New iPhone

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Letters: Jim Thorpe; The New iPhone

Letters: Jim Thorpe; The New iPhone

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Michele Norris and Melissa Block read listener letters reacting to Friday's program. Today's topics include Jim Thorpe, Pa.; dropped calls with the new iPhone; and mysterious music thumping from subwoofers during one bicyclist's commute.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

And I'm Michele Norris.

Time now for your comments. Friday I spoke with Jack Thorpe, one of the sons of Native American sports star Jim Thorpe. Jack Thorpe is suing Jim Thorpe, not his father but the eastern Pennsylvania town that named itself Jim Thorpe after buying the remains of the deceased athlete from his third wife.

Jack Thorpe wants his father's remains returned to his tribal homeland in Oklahoma.

Mr. JACK THORPE: I have nothing again Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania. They're a wonderful group of people. But I've stated before and I'll state it again: The bones of my father will not make or break that town. It's the people in that town. They can still continue to have the name. That's a wonderful honor.

BLOCK: Listener Barbara Sult(ph) of Cheverly, Maryland, writes to say she used to live near Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, when it was known by its original Native American name, Mauch Chunk.

Sult writes: Mauch Chunk has been economically redeveloped into a quaint arts-and-theater tourist area in recent decades. How much of that resulted from being the town that changed its name to Jim Thorpe is open to question. I for one wish they would take Mr. Thorpe's bones back home to his family and tribe and that the town would return to the name its original Indian settlers gave it.

NORRIS: Our story on complaints about dropped calls with the new iPhone didn't win much sympathy from our online listeners, including Tim Robinson-Ayer(ph) of Madison, Wisconsin. He posts this: Is there an app to get rid of hearing about the latest Apple product? Get a life, people, it's a phone. That overpriced one you bought six months ago just isn't good enough anymore? We're the crows of buying overpriced junk: Oh, look, something new and shiny.

BLOCK: And finally, we got this note from Michael Rebo(ph) of Lancaster, Ohio. He writes this: I'm a bicycling commuter and I'm frequently subject to being assaulted by the much-too-loud music of passing motorists. Earlier this week, I was waiting at a stoplight when a car pulled up behind me with a familiar thump-thump of subwoofers with power suitable for an outdoor rock concert. I struggled to recognize the music but quickly recognized it not as rap or country by the ALL THINGS CONSIDERED theme.

At the next light, I rode up next to the driver in an attempt to share with him how neat it was to hear someone jamming to NPR, but he was completely lost in his afternoon public-radio reverie. He concludes: May more people deafen themselves in such a manner.

NORRIS: Well, as much as you love listening to us, we love hearing from you. Just watch out for your eardrums. Write to us at npr.org, and just click on contact us at the bottom of the page.

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