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Byrd To Lie In Repose In Senate Chamber
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Byrd To Lie In Repose In Senate Chamber

Remembrances

Byrd To Lie In Repose In Senate Chamber

Byrd To Lie In Repose In Senate Chamber
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Sen. Robert Byrd of West Virginia died earlier this week at the age of 92. Byrd's body will in repose in the Senate chamber Thursday. A memorial service will be held in West Virginia Friday.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

For the first time in a half a century, a senator who has died in office lies in repose inside the U.S. Senate chamber. Colleagues have conferred that rare honor on West Virginia's Robert Byrd, who spent 51 years in the chamber, the longest-serving senator in history. Senator Byrd was 92 when he died on Monday.

This morning, members of the Senate and the House are paying their respects before a public viewing. Byrd's casket will then be flown to Charleston, West Virginia for a memorial service. It will be attended by both the president and the vice president and many of Robert Byrd's admirers from both sides of the aisle.

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MONTAGNE: You're listening to MORNING EDITION, from NPR News.

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