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Maureen Dowd's 'Girls' Guide To Saudi Arabia'

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Maureen Dowd's 'Girls' Guide To Saudi Arabia'

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Maureen Dowd's 'Girls' Guide To Saudi Arabia'

Maureen Dowd's 'Girls' Guide To Saudi Arabia'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128328830/128328813" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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"A Girls' Guide to Saudi Arabia" is the provocative headline splashed across a story in the new issue of Vanity Fair.

The author is the often provocative Maureen Dowd, a columnist for The New York Times.

Dowd recently spent 10 days in the kingdom — playing tourist, seeing the sights and pushing the limits of Saudi hospitality.

While there, she had to wear an abaya which is a loose, usually black robe worn by Muslim Women, and accompanied with a headscarf.

Dowd says the abaya "makes you look like a mummy and feel like a pizza oven."

About her time there, Dowd writes, "It's the most bewitching, bewildering, beheading vacation spot you'll never vacation in."

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