Haitians Press On Amid Slow Pace Of Quake Recovery

Final of two parts

Schoolchildren go to school in Port-au-Prince. i i

hide captionDespite the rubble and lack of permanent housing in post-quake Haiti, one positive sign is the vast number of children who have been able to return to school.

Marisa Penaloza/NPR
Schoolchildren go to school in Port-au-Prince.

Despite the rubble and lack of permanent housing in post-quake Haiti, one positive sign is the vast number of children who have been able to return to school.

Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Comparing Post-Disaster Giving

Post-Disaster Giving
Source: The Chronicle of Philanthropy
  • A woman walks down a path in the crowded Petionville Club camp in Port-au-Prince.
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    A woman walks down a path in the crowded Petionville Club camp in Port-au-Prince.
    Marisa Penaloza/NPR
  • Eva Laurent lives at the government resettlement camp in Corail-Cesselesse, outside Port-au-Prince. She's one of the many entrepreneurs developing a business in the tent city, selling eggs, fresh vegetables, rum, candy and cigarettes among other things.
    Hide caption
    Eva Laurent lives at the government resettlement camp in Corail-Cesselesse, outside Port-au-Prince. She's one of the many entrepreneurs developing a business in the tent city, selling eggs, fresh vegetables, rum, candy and cigarettes among other things.
    Marisa Penaloza/NPR
  • MFD camp in Haiti's capital is a hive of activity as residents work on drainage channels in preparation for the hurricane season. Teams break up the soil with picks, sweep trash and dig drainage channels in the cash-for-work program.
    Hide caption
    MFD camp in Haiti's capital is a hive of activity as residents work on drainage channels in preparation for the hurricane season. Teams break up the soil with picks, sweep trash and dig drainage channels in the cash-for-work program.
    Marisa Penaloza/NPR
  • A Haitian woman cooks beans and washes clothes outside her tent. A tarp protects her and her daughter from the scorching sunlight.
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    A Haitian woman cooks beans and washes clothes outside her tent. A tarp protects her and her daughter from the scorching sunlight.
    Marisa Penaloza/NPR
  • A guard stands outside a prototype "transitional" housing model at the resettlement camp in Corail-Cesselesse. World Vision along with several other aid agencies has developed these small dwellings, intended to house families of up to five people.
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    A guard stands outside a prototype "transitional" housing model at the resettlement camp in Corail-Cesselesse. World Vision along with several other aid agencies has developed these small dwellings, intended to house families of up to five people.
    Marisa Penaloza/NPR
  • Late in the afternoon at Petionville Club camp, children gather to fill water jugs. The water is purified and safe to drink.
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    Late in the afternoon at Petionville Club camp, children gather to fill water jugs. The water is purified and safe to drink.
    Marisa Penaloza/NPR
  • Marie Jules St. Julius lives in a tent in the Petionville Club camp, but she sent her two teenage children to live in the countryside with relatives. She divides her time, spending two weeks at the camp  — where she sells bags of chips, gum, cookies and cigarettes — and two weeks with her children.
    Hide caption
    Marie Jules St. Julius lives in a tent in the Petionville Club camp, but she sent her two teenage children to live in the countryside with relatives. She divides her time, spending two weeks at the camp — where she sells bags of chips, gum, cookies and cigarettes — and two weeks with her children.
    Carrie Kahn/NPR
  • Despite the rubble and lack of permanent housing, a positive sign is the vast number of children who have been able to return to school.
    Hide caption
    Despite the rubble and lack of permanent housing, a positive sign is the vast number of children who have been able to return to school.
    Marisa Penaloza/NPR

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