For Sale: Roy Rogers' Trusty Horse, Trigger

The celebrity couple that helped define an era, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans. i i

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans appeared in more than 100 films together -- often with Trigger (below), whose tricks ranged from dancing the hula to untying ropes and shooting a gun. Christie's Images Ltd. hide caption

itoggle caption Christie's Images Ltd.
The celebrity couple that helped define an era, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans.

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans appeared in more than 100 films together -- often with Trigger (below), whose tricks ranged from dancing the hula to untying ropes and shooting a gun.

Christie's Images Ltd.
The horse Trigger was part of Roy Rogers' life for nearly three decades. i i
Christie's Images Ltd.
The horse Trigger was part of Roy Rogers' life for nearly three decades.

Trigger learned many tricks during his long career, from dancing the hula to untying ropes and shooting a gun.

Christie's Images Ltd.

Memorabilia from the career of Roy Rogers, one of the last of the singing cowboys, goes on the auction block today. Rogers starred in more than 100 movies and a long-running TV show. His cowboy hats, boots, guitars — even a 1964 convertible, with six-shooters for door handles — are being sold by Christie's.

The highlight of the sale is likely to be Rogers' faithful horse and fellow performer, the ever-trusty Trigger.

"If you think of Roy, you think of Trigger. They really go hand in hand," says Cathy Elkies, Christie's director of iconic collections.

Trigger was more than a movie star. During World War II, he and Rogers performed all over the country, raising millions in the sale of bonds to aid the war effort.

"When Trigger died, Roy was so incredibly bereft that he didn't want to bury Trigger," Elkies says.

The alternative was to keep the horse around, which led to one of the most famous taxidermy jobs of all time. Trigger, who died one day before his 31st birthday, in 1965, was on display for many years at the Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Museum in Victorville, Calif.

"He is actually mounted in the gallery in his most famous rearing position," Elkies says.

The horse could bring up to $200,000. Rogers also stuffed and mounted his dog, Bullet, who was also a fixture in TV shows and films. He's expected to fetch at least $10,000.

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