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Rare, Stinky Flower To Bloom In Houston

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Rare, Stinky Flower To Bloom In Houston

Strange News

Rare, Stinky Flower To Bloom In Houston

Rare, Stinky Flower To Bloom In Houston

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  • Transcript

There's something rotten at the Houston Museum of Natural Science and it's a nearly 5 feet tall flower. The corpse flower is an extremely rare plant that smells like rotting meat when open. Apparently, that's a crowd pleaser — the museum is staying open 24 hours during the flowering.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

Good morning. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

There's something rotten at the Houston Museum of Natural Science and it's a 64 inch flower named Lois. Lois is a corpse flower, an extremely rare plant that smells like rotting meat when open. Apparently, that's a crowd pleaser - the museum's staying open 24 hours during the flowering. But don't worry if you're not in Houston, the flower has a Twitter feed and a webcam, though online, of course, you will miss out on the stench.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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