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Through Rain, Sleet, Snow, Lifesaving

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Through Rain, Sleet, Snow, Lifesaving

Around the Nation

Through Rain, Sleet, Snow, Lifesaving

Through Rain, Sleet, Snow, Lifesaving

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On Saturday, Keith McVey was delivering mail in Akron, Ohio, when he came across a man frantically shaking his friend, who was unconscious and not breathing. McVey, a former firefighter and EMT, revived the friend using CPR. It wasn't the first time the mail carrier has saved someone's life while delivering mail — it was the THIRD time in the past 20 years. McVey talks with Michele Norris.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

You might remember, a few years back, that movie "Unbreakable." Bruce Willis played an ordinary guy who found out he had the extraordinary powers of a superhero. He always seemed to be at the right place at the right time.

Akron, Ohio mailman Keith McVey may not have superpowers, and he doesn't like the word hero but he is a lifesaver. On Saturday, he was delivering the mail, when he came across a young man frantically shaking his friend, who was unconscious and not breathing.

McVey, a former firefighter and EMT, revived the friend using CPR for the first time in 30 years. It's a great story regardless, but what makes the story truly amazing is this: It's the third time hes saved someone's life over the past 20 years while delivering the mail.

Well, joining me from his route is the good samaritan mailman Keith McVey. Thanks so much for being with us. I imagine you there with a postal uniform and a superhero cape.

Mr. KEITH McVEY (Postal Carrier): Yes, ma'am. I have a postal uniform on, but my cape I must have forgot at home.

(Soundbite of laughter)

NORRIS: Okay, it's too hot in the middle of summer to wear a cape anyway.

Mr. McVEY: Too hot for the cape today, yes, ma'am.

NORRIS: So you have saved a small girl who was drowning in a lake. You saved a man after he jumped from a bridge, you got down to him and provided warmth and comfort until help could arrive. And now you've saved someone who needed CPR. How does this keep happening to you?

Mr. McVEY: I am still looking for the answer myself. So I guess maybe a higher power, a little intervention of some sort is maybe putting me at the right place at the right time. It just seems that that's the way it ends up.

NORRIS: You know, in each of these incidents, it sounds like you made a choice. You couldve called 911 to get someone else to do the CPR. You could've called for someone else to go in the lake. You could've waited until someone else helped the young man who jumped off the bridge. Where does the impulse come from for you to jump in the water or shimmy down the bridge or run to the backyard?

Mr. McVEY: Well, I did have a cell phone the day the girl was drowning but there was no chance of any ambulance or any help. It was a matter of you have to act and you have to act right now.

NORRIS: What have people there made of this story? Im sure there are a lot of people who want to hear your story. You must be a bit of a media star right now.

Mr. McVEY: I've got so many handshakes and hugs. The people around me have just it's sometimes a little overwhelming. People are thankful, grateful, just happy to hear the good stories, I guess.

NORRIS: You've worked as a firefighter. You also worked as an EMT in the past. Are you sure you have the right job? Are you sure you shouldn't be just saving lives full-time instead of working as a postal worker?

Mr. McVEY: Well, the postal service has been very good to me. Maybe I guess I do a little bit of good deeds on the side. So I think everything's working out okay so far.

NORRIS: Keith McVey, it's been a pleasure to talk to you. All the best to you.

Mr. McVEY: Thank you very much, ma'am. Thank you for having me.

NORRIS: That's Akron, Ohio mailman Keith McVey. Over the past 20 years, he's saved three people's lives while delivering the mail.

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