Facebook Ripped In Consumer Satisfaction Survey

Facebook, which looks set to boast its 500-millionth member, emerged as a surprise loser in a new report from the American Customer Satisfaction Index that ranks the top 30 social media sites. Users complained about privacy concerns, interface changes, navigation problems and advertising.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today: bigger is not always better.

A new report from the American Customer Satisfaction Index ranks the top 30 social media sites. Facebook, which now has some 500 million members, emerged as a surprise loser. In the survey, users complained about privacy concerns, interface changes, navigation problems, and advertising.

Facebook scored a measly 64 on the scale of one to 100. That's lower than an IRS site.

Topping the list of satisfying social media sites, the collaborative online encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION. I'm Renee Montagne.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

And I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

(Soundbite of song, "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction")

Mr. MICK JAGGER (Singer, The Rolling Stones): (Singing) ...satisfaction. No satisfaction, no satisfaction, no satisfaction.

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