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U.S. Searches For Missing Naval Personnel

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U.S. Searches For Missing Naval Personnel

Afghanistan

U.S. Searches For Missing Naval Personnel

U.S. Searches For Missing Naval Personnel

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U.S. and Afghan forces have expanded their manhunt for two U.S. naval personnel. The sailors departed their compound, traveled to a dangerous region of Afghanistan called Logar Province, and did not return. A Taliban spokesman says the two were ambushed — one killed, and one captured.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DON GONYEA, Host:

Over the weekend, two U.S. Navy personnel in Kabul left their base in an armored vehicle. Later, Afghan officials reported an ambush 60 miles away, stating that one of the Americans was killed and the other captured. The attack took place in Logar Province, in an area controlled by the Taliban. NPR's Quil Lawrence sent this report from Kabul.

QUIL LAWRENCE: U.S. officials still will not confirm what happened to the men, only saying they are missing and admitting that their car was discovered in Logar. Even the Taliban would not confirm details for almost two days.

ZABIHULLAH MUJAHED: (Foreign language spoken)

LAWRENCE: Head of the Joint Chiefs, Admiral Mike Mullen, was in Kabul yesterday.

MIKE MULLEN: We will do all we can, everything we can. We've got a large number of forces focused on the return of these two individuals.

LAWRENCE: Quil Lawrence, NPR News, Kabul.

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