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No Immediate Need to Repair Shuttle, NASA Says

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No Immediate Need to Repair Shuttle, NASA Says

Space

No Immediate Need to Repair Shuttle, NASA Says

No Immediate Need to Repair Shuttle, NASA Says

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12877600/12877601" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A close-up view of damaged tiles on the underside of Endeavour. NASA hide caption

toggle caption NASA

A close-up view of damaged tiles on the underside of Endeavour.

NASA

During Endeavour's lift off last week, debris gouged a hole in external tiles on the space shuttle. After a battery of tests, NASA decided not to repair to the damage. They say the ding is too small to endanger the astronauts, though it may cause structural damage to the shuttle.

Pat Duggins, author, Final Countdown: NASA and the End of the Space Shuttle Program; senior news analyst, WMFE, Orlando, Fla.

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