Ocean Policy

According to the Pew Oceans Commission report released this week, our oceans are in trouble. Fish stocks are down and coastal development is having a devastating affect on the waters. The report is just the latest of several that say the oceans and its fish populations are in danger of collapsing. Industry groups say fishery management plans are working, and our oceans are doing fine. Join host Ira Flatow for a discussion about the health of our oceans. Does ocean management need an overhaul?

Guests:

John P. Connelly
*President, National Fisheries Institute, Arlington, Va.

Charles Kennel
*Director, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego
*Member, Pew Oceans Commission, La Jolla, Calif.

Michael Sissenwine
*Director of Science Programs, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Silver Spring, Md.

Vice Admiral Paul G. Gaffney II
*Commissioner, U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy
*Senior Uniformed Oceanography Specialist, U.S. Navy
*President, National Defense University, Washington, D.C.

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