NPR logo

Free Reed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1289873/1289874" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Free Reed

Free Reed

Free Reed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1289873/1289874" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Robert Siegel talks with accordionist Daniel Barski. As a youngster, Barski was fascinated with the accordion and classical music. His hope was to put together an accordion ensemble, but he was discouraged by a high school music teacher. Barski put down the accordion for 30 years. Now he has a small studio in his basement, and has revived his love for the instrument, recording music by Gluck, Satie, Vivaldi and others by overdubbing his own parts on to tape and mixing them down. His homemade cd is called Free Reed Odyssey. If you are interested in more information, on how to find the CD, Daniel encourages writing to him at dbarski@ronco.net.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.