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High Schoolers Enjoy CSI Summer Camp

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High Schoolers Enjoy CSI Summer Camp

Business

High Schoolers Enjoy CSI Summer Camp

High Schoolers Enjoy CSI Summer Camp

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Thanks to TV crime shows, forensic science summer camps are popping up nationwide. There's Stockton CSI camp in New Jersey and at least half a dozen others, according to The Wall Street Journal. Instead of singing around the campfire, high school students spend their break collecting evidence and dusting for fingerprints.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And now for our last word in business. It's an update on that beloved summer ritual: camp. Summer camp these days isn't just about swimming and arts and crafts. Some kids are wiling away their long break from school poring over blood stains, and analyzing DNA and hair fibers.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Thanks to TV shows like "Law and Order" and "CSI," forensic science summer camps are popping up nationwide. Why didn't I think of this for my daughter? There's Stockton CSI camp in New Jersey, and at least half a dozen others, according to the Wall Street Journal. Instead of sing-alongs and s'mores by the campfire, high schoolers spend their break collecting evidence and dusting for fingerprints.

MONTAGNE: It can get grisly and probably isn't for those who prefer basket-weaving, and also not for five-year-olds like your daughter. But camps like these could prepare teens for a career fighting crime, or at least writing scripts for TV crime shows.

(Soundbite of song, "Won't Get Fooled Again")

MONTAGNE: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: You don't know my daughter, do you?

(Soundbite of laughter)

MONTAGNE: I do know your daughter.

INSKEEP: Well, of course, you do.

MONTAGNE: I think she's very advanced.

INSKEEP: She'd be eager to do that.

Okay. Here's Roger Daltrey.

(Soundbite of song, "Won't Get Fooled Again")

THE WHO (Rock Band): (Singing) ...with our children at our feet and the morals that they worship...

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