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Time To Get Very Creative

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Time To Get Very Creative

Time To Get Very Creative

Time To Get Very Creative

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On-Air Challenge

Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the initials V.C. For example, given "serving of calf's meat," the answer would be "veal chop."

Last Week's Challenge

This was a two-week creative challenge. Come up with a riddle that starts off with "What's the difference between" and involves a spoonerism. A spoonerism is when consonant sounds are interchanged. For example, "What's the difference between an ornithologist and a loser in a spelling bee?" The answer: "One is a bird watcher, and the other is a word botcher." Another example: "What's the difference between an iceberg and a groom at a stable?" The answer: "One crushes boats, while the other brushes coats." Entries will be judged on cleverness, originality and naturalness of syntax.

Winner: Michael True of Falls Church, Va.

His Answer: What's the difference between a wedding chapel and a restaurant's daily specials? One is a marrying venue, the other is a varying menu.

Runners-Up: Pat Mauer of Los Angeles for "What’s the difference between a guinea hen and a young witch? One is a wild chicken and the other is a child Wiccan."

Gary Disch of Ottawa, Ontario, for "What’s the difference between a dasher and a haberdasher? One makes short spurts and the other makes sports shirts."

Next Week's Challenge

From Merl Reagle: Take the letters in the name of cellist Yo Yo Ma, and rearrange them to form the initial letters of a familiar six-word question. What is the question?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

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