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Laurie Anderson On World Cafe

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Laurie Anderson On World Cafe

Laurie Anderson On World Cafe

Laurie Anderson On World Cafe

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Web Extra: 'Mambo Bling'

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Laurie Anderson, first lady of the avant-garde, recently visited World Cafe. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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courtesy of the artist

Laurie Anderson, first lady of the avant-garde, recently visited World Cafe.

courtesy of the artist

Set List

  • "Only An Expert"

A lot has happened in America since Laurie Anderson's last proper album, 2001's Life on a String. New York City — her home — was attacked. The U.S. government entered two wars. Hurricane Katrina hit, the housing bubble popped and Wall Street went belly-up (for a while anyway).

Tragic all of it, but damned if it doesn't make for ample inspiration. Anderson draws on most of it for her new album, Homeland, a sprawling, introspective account of what it means to live in America today. The experimental pop star fleshed out her vision with the help of John Zorn, Antony Hegarty, Four Tet and husband Lou Reed.

Anderson speaks with World Cafe host David Dye about the making of Homeland, how she arrived at its title and its overtly political themes.

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