Fans Tout Warren To Head New Consumer Agency

Harvard law professor Elizabeth Warren is said to be one of the top candidates to lead the new Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. The bureau was her idea and a key part of the recently-passed financial bill. A liberal group called the Main Street Brigade is rooting for her, and put together a music video.

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Today's last word in business...

(Soundbite of song, "Got A New Sheriff")

MAIN STREET BRIGADE (Music Group): (Rapping) Elizabeth Warren, we got your back.

WERTHEIMER: That would be Elizabeth Warren, the Harvard law professor. She's said to be one of the top candidates to lead the new Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. The bureau was her idea, and a key part of the recently passed financial bill.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And apparently, some of her fans really want her to get the job. They're rooting for her with a fervor rarely seen in Senate-confirmable appointments. Hence this music video, put together by a liberal group called the Main Street Brigade.

(Soundbite of song, "Got A New Sheriff")

MAIN STREET BRIGADE: (Rapping) Sheriff Warren is what we need, yo, and we plead, yo. She's not about the money, money, money and the green-o. She's about...

WERTHEIMER: We called professor Warren's office to see whether she liked being called sheriff, but her spokesman said she had no comment for now.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(Soundbite of song, "Got A New Sheriff")

MAIN STREET BRIGADE: (Rapping) ...got, got a new sheriff - Warren. Got, got a new sheriff - Elizabeth. Got, got a new sheriff - Warren. Elizabeth Warren.

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