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A Syllable Solution

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A Syllable Solution

A Syllable Solution

A Syllable Solution

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On-Air Challenge

Remove the vowel in the (unaccented) first syllable of one word to come up with a new word that's a syllable shorter but sounds the same. For example, "succumb" becomes "scum."

Last Week's Challenge

Name two girls' names that are anagrams of each other and start with the letter "C." The answer should be a well-mixed anagram, with more than two letters switched in one name to get the other.

Preferred Answer: Caroline and Cornelia (will accept: Clara and Carla)

Winner: Mangalam Gopal of Houghton, Mich.

Next Week's Challenge

From Sandy Weisz: Take a country whose name contains a symbol for a chemical element, and change it to a different chemical element to get another country. For example, if Aruba were an independent country, you could take the "AR," which is the chemical symbol for argon, and change it to "C," which is the chemical symbol for carbon, to come up with Cuba. There are two answers to this puzzle, and both must be found.

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

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