Letters: Radiologists; Craigslist Sex Ads; Dodgers Listeners weigh in on what radiologists really do, take exception to the way Melissa Block phrased a question during an interview about sex ads on Craigslist, and set the record straight about where the Dodgers did and did not go during the 2009 Major League Baseball season.
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Letters: Radiologists; Craigslist Sex Ads; Dodgers

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Letters: Radiologists; Craigslist Sex Ads; Dodgers

Letters: Radiologists; Craigslist Sex Ads; Dodgers

Letters: Radiologists; Craigslist Sex Ads; Dodgers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129454408/129454395" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Listeners weigh in on what radiologists really do, take exception to the way Melissa Block phrased a question during an interview about sex ads on Craigslist, and set the record straight about where the Dodgers did and did not go during the 2009 Major League Baseball season.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

It's time now for a few comments about yesterday's program. A number of radiologists took exception to something Julie Rovner said in her report about primary care doctors and why fewer med school graduates choose the field.

JULIE ROVNER: Primary care doctors work long hours, including nights and weekends, and it's much more emotionally demanding work than something like radiology where you're basically looking at pictures all the time.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Well, radiologist John Ende of Ashville, North Carolina says he does more than look at pictures. And he writes this: Sometimes I perform procedures such as lung biopsies. This includes calming the expected anxiety of the patient and being able to quickly deal with potential life-threatening complications during the procedure.

Sometimes I find myself in a dark ultrasound room with nervous parents as I decide whether or not to send their infant to surgery. And he adds, he'd be more than happy to give Julie or any other NPR reporter an in-depth view of what it means to be a radiologist.

BLOCK: Several of you objected when I said this, in an interview with Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster about the push to get Craigslist to shut down its adult services section.

Mr. CHRIS KOSTER (Attorney General, Missouri): Craig Newmark is providing a bulletin board for conduct that frequently violates the laws of the 50 states.

BLOCK: I take your point about these ads promoting prostitution, which is illegal. Wouldn't that be a little bit different, though, from saying that women are being victimized? One does not necessarily imply the other, I think.

SIEGEL: Well, Kate Royal(ph) of Denver, Colorado has this to say: While I appreciate your attempt at playing devil's advocate, please don't perpetuate the harmful "Pretty Woman" myth. Royal writes this: In four years of working with sex industry workers, my clientele age range spans from 12-year-olds to grandmothers. I've learned that this vicious cycle is most difficult to recognize, let alone escape for victims of all ages.

BLOCK: And, finally, a correction. In our report about Frank and Jamie McCourt's multimillion dollar divorce case, we said that the L.A. Dodgers were in last year's World Series.

SIEGEL: Wrong.

BLOCK: Oops.

SIEGEL: It was the Phillies versus the Yankees and the Yankees won. You could look it up.

BLOCK: If you think we struck out on something else, go to our website, NPR.org and click on Contact Us at the bottom of the page.

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