Has Celebrity Worship Gone Too Far? Two toilets, each previously owned by a celebrity, were on the auction block last week. That got musician David Was wondering if perhaps we've gone a little too far in our worship of celebrities.
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Has Celebrity Worship Gone Too Far?

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Has Celebrity Worship Gone Too Far?

Has Celebrity Worship Gone Too Far?

Has Celebrity Worship Gone Too Far?

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  • Transcript

Two toilets, each previously owned by a celebrity, were on the auction block last week. That got musician David Was wondering if perhaps we've gone a little too far in our worship of celebrities.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

Well, musician David Was thinks he's found an example of celeb worship taken too far. He's talking about the auction of two celebrity toilets.

DAVID WAS: Imagine no possessions, Lennon famously wrote, I wonder if you can. The answer is a resolute no. Everything is for sale, especially if a celebrity touched, breathed upon or otherwise - um, utilized it.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

JOHN LENNON: (Singing) ...and the world will live as one.

WAS: Add to that Jack Nicholson's baby teeth - you can't handle the tooth - a cough drop spit out by Arnold Schwarzenegger, and a Daily Variety delivered to and read by Marlon Brando.

SIEGEL: An Historian's Review of the Gospels," by Michael Grant. He devoured it in a week's time, arriving at the studio every morning with the book rolled up and crammed into his front pants pocket. It is disheveled, missing several critical chapters, and you can have it today for a starting bid of - shall we say $10 million?

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BLOCK: Musician David Was lives in Los Angeles.

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