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Drilling Begins To Reach Trapped Miners In Chile

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Drilling Begins To Reach Trapped Miners In Chile

Latin America

Drilling Begins To Reach Trapped Miners In Chile

Drilling Begins To Reach Trapped Miners In Chile

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Rescue workers in Chile have begun drilling a preliminary test hole into the solid rock. The plan is to make that hole about the size of bicycle tire. That would allow just enough space to hoist up the 33 miners one at a time. The rescue operation is expected to take months.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Here's another story we're following this morning. It's those miners trapped a half mile underground in Chile. Rescue workers have begun drilling a preliminary test hole into the solid rock. The plan is to make that hole about the size of a bicycle tire, which would allow just enough space to hoist up the 33 miners one at a time.

The rescue operation is expected to take months. And these miners have already been trapped for 26 days. The Associated Press says they have now been stuck underground longer than any other miners. Last year, three miners survived 25 days after being trapped in a flooded mine in southern China.

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