NPR logo

The Economy Gets Tough; The Tough Still Shop

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129647714/129647689" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Economy Gets Tough; The Tough Still Shop

Economy

The Economy Gets Tough; The Tough Still Shop

The Economy Gets Tough; The Tough Still Shop

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129647714/129647689" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Reporter Jay Field visits a mall in Lincolnwood, Ill., to query consumers on their spending habits in the difficult economy.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

We turn now to Lincoln Wood, Illinois, a suburb north of Chicago, where reporter Jay Field talked to people at - where else? - a mall, and asked them how they're faring in this economy.

Ms. CATE KANE: I'm Cate Kane and I live in Evanston. We work in the theater. We've been out of work this summer and we're a little cautious.

JAY FIELD: Do you feel like you're, you know, you're spending decisions of late are influenced by the kind of economic reports you're hearing on the news?

Ms. KANE: It's more sort of an underlying sense of - I would call it a low-grade anxiety. But I don't know how much it's based on actual fact and what we read in the paper as much as fearing the worst.

FIELD: Are you guys often doing, you know, jobs to support your theater work?

Ms. KANE: We have been very lucky in that we haven't had to do that for several years, but we are on the dole right now.

Mr. STUART MACHEK: My name is Stuart Machek and I live in Rogers Park. I think I've been a little less touched by the economy than most other people. I've had a solid job for about a year and a half now with a company that has about 30 percent growth even in this down economy every year.

I'm probably spending about the same, but I'm certainly more aware of my spending now. How much, you know, everything is. I eat out less. I do a lot of other things like that.

Ms. ABIDA SAYED: I am Abida Sayed, and I live in Evanston, Illinois. I had to check on a few shoes and a sweater. And I especially came to this store because they usually have like marked down merchandise. Because of the economy I cannot afford to pay the full price, you know. Even if I like it, I let it go, because I just don't afford to.

FIELD: Are you employed right now?

Ms. SAYED: Yes. I have a small daycare. I lost a few clients, because they lost their jobs. So we just couldn't continue relying upon their income.

Ms. MELISSA FARRELL: My name is Melissa Farrell. I live in Rogers Park in Chicago. It being summer, things have been a little bit looser just because you want to have some fun during the summer, but we're kind of watching every penny, trying to do budgeting. In fact, with the beginning of the month I just did budgets all morning. Pretty stressful. I'm trying to figure out how we're going to save money for, you know, the rest of the year, not knowing what's going to happen.

(Soundbite of music)

SIMON: Cate Kane, Stuart Machek, Abida Sayed and Melissa Farrell in Lincoln Wood, Illinois.��

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.