Survey: Teenagers Are Sleep Deprived

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Parents who have to drag their kids out of bed for school may consider this advice from Dr. Jason Eberhart-Phillips, the top health officer in Kansas. He says teenagers don't get enough sleep — they should be sleeping nine or 10 hours per night. But studies indicate that very few do. He suggests the state should push back the starting time for classes.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Parents who have to drag their kids out of bed for school, may consider this advice from a health official. He's the top health official in Kansas, and he says teenagers don't get enough sleep. They should be sleeping nine or 10 hours per night. But studies suggest that very few do. And so, the official says, the state should push back the starting time for class. Other states did this already, improving attendance and performance.

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