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Call For Stories: New Jersey's Passaic River

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Call For Stories: New Jersey's Passaic River

Call For Stories: New Jersey's Passaic River

Call For Stories: New Jersey's Passaic River

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129756149/129756666" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new series will explore New Jersey's Passaic River. The river was the springboard for the country's early efforts to manufacture goods and become economically independent from Europe. As a result, the river was overused, polluted and later chemically poisoned. Yet parts of it are stunning — including the second largest waterfall in the east after Niagara Falls. Melissa Block asks listeners to send in their stories and photos of the Passaic.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

You've heard about many rivers on this and other NPR programs.

(Soundbite of archived broadcast)

MICHAEL O'SULLIVAN: ...and an even tinier trickle, some 3,000 miles from where the Mekong finally ends...

OFEIBEA QUIST-ARCTON: The expansive brown waters rush over the giant boulders here on the Congo River in...

ROB GIFFORD: The first thing you notice is the silence here at the source of the Yellow River.

PHILIP REEVES: A honey-colored dawn is breaking on the Ganges...

BLOCK: Well, soon, we're going to hear about one more river, a little closer to home: New Jersey's Passaic River, which has been badly abused and polluted. The Passaic kick-started American manufacturing in the 1800s, and we plan to tell its story later this fall.

But we need your help. If you've ever lived or worked along the Passaic, we want to hear your stories and see your photos. If you have no Passaic connection but you're curious about it, please send us your questions. You can email us at river@npr.org.

(Soundbite of music)

BLOCK: You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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