Study: Video Games Help With Decision Making

A new study finds that playing action-packed video games help people make fast and accurate decisions. In the journal Current Biology, researchers say video games might be a good way to train people who need to make decisions quickly — everyone from surgeons to soldiers.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business comes from the world of video games. So much for those people who said they were a waste of time.

A new study finds that playing action-packed games helps people make fast and accurate decisions.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

In the journal Current Biology, researchers say video games might be a good way to train people who need to make decisions quickly - everyone from surgeons to soldiers.

Those findings may come as good news for people looking for an excuse to stay home and play the latest version of the science fiction video game series Halo, which came out this week. The new game, called Reach, is already the top seller on Amazon.

INSKEEP: Or gamers could turn to an old favorite.

(Soundbite of video game)

INSKEEP: And play Super Mario Brothers. The game turns 25 this week. And Nintendo says its sales are doing fine. The plumber with the red cap has sold almost a quarter of a billion games since 1985.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

WERTHEIMER: And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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