Shakespeare To Be Performed In Klingon

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In one of the Star Trek movies, Mr. Spock is talking with Klingons when somebody quotes from William Shakespeare. A linguist developed that fictional language, and now he's president of the Washington Shakespeare Company. At a benefit this weekend, the company will perform scenes of Shakespeare, first in English then in Klingon.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

We're following one other story this morning, which we'll try not to lose in translation. In one of the Star Trek movies, Mr. Spock is talking with Klingons when somebody quotes from William Shakespeare.

(Soundbite of movie, " Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country")

Mr. LEONARD NIMOY (Actor): (As Captain Spock) Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 1.

Mr. DAVID WARNER (Actor): (As Klingon Chancellor Gorkon) You have not experienced Shakespeare until you have read him in the original Klingon.

(Soundbite of laughter)

INSKEEP: The original Klingon. A linguist developed that fictional language -and now heads the Washington Shakespeare Company. At a benefit this weekend, the company will perform Shakespeare, first in English, then in Klingon.

Unidentified Man: (Speaking Klingon)

INSKEEP: That's a YouTube video of the famous line, To be or not to be, that is the question.

(Soundbite of "Star Trek Theme")

INSKEEP: (Speaking Klingon) NPR.

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