The Bug: Darkly Sinister, With A Hypnotic Beat The Bug's "Catch a Fire" employs the ethereal voice of Kiki Hitomi to help generate a sense of running in place. As Hitomi sings about "kids killing children outside my doorstep," the echoes of the snare sound like rhythmic gunfire.
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'Catch a Fire' by The Bug

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The Bug: Darkly Sinister, With A Hypnotic Beat

The Bug: Darkly Sinister, With A Hypnotic Beat

'Catch a Fire' by The Bug

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The Bug's "Catch a Fire" employs the ethereal voice of Kiki Hitomi to help generate a sense of running in place. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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The Bug's "Catch a Fire" employs the ethereal voice of Kiki Hitomi to help generate a sense of running in place.

courtesy of the artist

Friday's Pick

  • Song: "Catch a Fire"
  • Artist: The Bug
  • CD: Various Artists, Ninja Tune XX
  • Genre: Dub

Combining a darkly sinister sound reminiscent of Portishead with a hook suitable for M.I.A., The Bug's "Catch a Fire" employs the ethereal voice of Kiki Hitomi to help generate a sense of running in place. As Hitomi sings about "kids killing children outside my doorstep," the echoes of the snare sound like rhythmic gunfire.

Minor-key chords transport "Catch a Fire" onto an eerie abandoned street, where the rain-soaked asphalt glitters under flickering street lights. Telling a haunting tale about the urban landscapes of London, the words swirl around imagery of "crackheads, pissheads and hoodrats." The song is bathed in implicit violence, with a brief bridge led by a fuzzed-out guitar, before you're launched back into that hypnotic beat.

At song's end, there's an electronic effect that feels as if it's created by bullets whizzing by a windchime through your headphones. Careful: Warning shots have been fired. The thumping beat may have stopped, but your heart is still pounding in your chest. At least you hope so.