Your Letters: Dick Dale; Cell Phones And Driving

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Many of you enjoyed Liane Hansen's interview with musician Dick Dale, known as the King of the Surf Guitar. Also, reporter Brian Naylor's story on whether to allow drivers to use cell phones sparked a debate on our website. Guest host Rebecca Roberts reads e-mails and comments from listeners about last week's show.

REBECCA ROBERTS, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rebecca Roberts.

Now to your letters. Many of you enjoyed Liane Hansen's interview with musician Dick Dale, known as the King of the Surf Guitar.

Mr. DICK DALE (Musician): So, I went and put an interlude to that rhythm and I went (makes sounds) like that.

(Soundbite of music)

ROBERTS: The interview brought back memories for Samantha McTighe(ph) of San Luis Obispo, California. She says Dick Dale was a fixture in her hometown when she was a teenager. She writes: I came of age in the mid-'60s at Harmony Park, an old dance hall in Orange County, where he played every week. I remember as the night wore on and his riffs got more intense, we would stamp our feet on the wooden floor and wonder if we'd literally bring the house down. But I had no idea what a musical scholar he is until today, listening to his insights about rhythm and his musical heritage.

Reporter Brian Naylor's story on whether to allow drivers to use cell phones sparked a debate on our website. Many people shared their own close encounters with drivers who were using cell phones to chat or text. Writes Jacques Bouvier on NPR.org: As someone who was run down on a crosswalk by a driver who was more interested in his cell phone than driving, there's only one answer for me. If people will not voluntarily hang up phones when driving, then there should be a law.

But Vlad Butsky thinks there has to be a better way. He writes on our website: Why is it every time we try to solve problem, we try to ban something? The problem is distracted driving, right? Let's spend our energy on educating drivers and not on discussing the next thing to ban.

We want to hear from you. To e-mail us, go to NPR.org and click on the Contact the Show link. You can find us on Twitter as well: we're @NPRWeekend. We're also at Facebook.com/NPRWeekend.

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