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Halladay Pitches Second No-Hitter Of The Season

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Halladay Pitches Second No-Hitter Of The Season

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Halladay Pitches Second No-Hitter Of The Season

Halladay Pitches Second No-Hitter Of The Season

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Philadelphia Phillies right-hander Roy Halladay threw a no-hitter Wednesday night against the Cincinnati Reds. It's only the second no-hitter in post-season baseball. The Phillies beat the Reds 4-0. Halladay threw another perfect game on May 29.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

The baseball playoffs are underway and on day one there were a couple of dazzling pitching performances. Cliff Lee of the Texas Rangers burned the Tampa Bay Rays with 10 strikeouts and a 5-1 Rangers win. And after that, Philadelphia Phillies ace Roy Halladay went out and made history. Halladay pitched a no-hitter in the Phillies 4-0 win over Cincinnati, the second post-season no-hitter ever. Here's NPR's Tom Goldman.

TOM GOLDMAN: His nickname is for a famous Western gunfighter, and last night in Philadelphia, Roy Doc Halladay pitched a one-sided shootout in his first ever playoff start. The Cincinnati Reds were the best-hitting team in the national league this season, but not against the veteran Halladay. Reds right-fielder Jay Bruce got further than any of his teammates. He was the only one to reach first base on a walk in the fifth inning.

Mr. JAY BRUCE (Cincinnati Reds): We had nothing going all night. We couldn't get anything going, couldn't get any rhythm going. He beat us, singlehandedly beat us.

GOLDMAN: It sure looked like it, but of course not from Halladay's perspective. Remember, this is a guy who pitched a perfect game in May. Last night made him the fifth pitcher in Major League history to throw two no-hitters in one season. And after he pitched the perfect game, he bought 60 or so fine Swiss watches for teammates and others in the organization, including media relations staff and the bat boy, for their part, no matter how small, in what he did. So last night Halladay repeatedly gave credit to his catcher, Carlos Ruiz, for calling the right pitches.

Mr. ROY HALLADAY (Philadelphia Phillies): You know, changeup has been a little bit hit and miss for me the last few times out, and it was good today. He recognized that early, continued to call it, and did it in, you know, good situations.

(Soundbite of radio broadcast)

Unidentified Man (Announcer): A swing and a dribbler, out in front of the plate. Ruiz out to get it, the throw from his knees (unintelligible) and it's a no-hitter! Unbelievable!

GOLDMAN: Thanks should have also gone to Ruiz for the last play of the game, heard here on Philadelphia's 1210-AM WPHT. Ruiz definitely picked up the ball right next to the hitter's bat, threw around the hitter, who was sprinting to first base, and made the tough out. The image of Ruiz hugging Halladay wasn't quite the iconic scene of 54 years ago. That's when New York Yankees catcher Yogi Berra jumped into the arms of pitcher Don Larsen after Larsen completed his famous perfect game in the 1956 World Series. Larsen and Halladay now are joined by greatness, the only two men to throw post-season no-hitters.

Tom Goldman, NPR News.

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