Candy Claws: The Sounds Of Jumbled Poetry

Candy Claws i i

Candy Claws' "Silent Time of Earth" evokes vibrant images of a natural world that's more Disney than National Geographic. courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption courtesy of the artist
Candy Claws

Candy Claws' "Silent Time of Earth" evokes vibrant images of a natural world that's more Disney than National Geographic.

courtesy of the artist

Thursday's Pick

  • Song: "Silent Time of Earth"
  • Artist: Candy Claws
  • CD: Hidden Lands
  • Genre: Rock

Candy Claws brings a fresh perspective to the phrase "environmentally friendly," but that's not to suggest that the band is calling for an eco-uprising. Even if the hushed vocals were halfway intelligible, the words are nothing more than pleasant-sounding nonsense.

It's really just the music: The Colorado group's sound evokes vibrant images of a natural world that's more Disney than National Geographic. Electric birdsong and clop-along percussion stand out among the most prominent noises in "Silent Time of Earth," but they coexist nicely with sparkling keys and a bridge characterized by its strange bass throb. While most of the songs on Hidden Lands sound like spring, this one doesn't feel pegged to a season.

The vocals of Ryan Hover and Kay Bertholf guide the procession with their lithe half-whispers. While their vocals aren't always audible, there's something to be said about their invention. Hover recently revealed that the band took sections of Richard Ketchum's The Secret Life of the Forest, entered each into an English-to-Japanese translator online, and then translated the symbols back into English. The result, as he calls it, was "jumbled poetry."

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