Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Limericks

Carl reads three news-related limericks: Brazilian politics is becoming a circus; science discovers gentle Neanderthals; laptops not safe for laps?

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PETER SAGAL, Host:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank. But first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924 or you can click the contact us link on our website, waitwait.npr.org. There you can find out about attending our weekly live shows at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago and check out this week's Sandwich Monday post on our blog. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

JASON BRILL: Hi.

SAGAL: Hi, who's this?

BRILL: Jason.

SAGAL: Hey, Jason, how are you?

BRILL: I'm doing well, thank you.

SAGAL: I'm so glad to hear it. Where are you calling from?

BRILL: Cleveland, Ohio.

SAGAL: Cleveland, Ohio.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: We've got some Clevelanders here.

BRILL: Thank you.

SAGAL: Who left to come to New York.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: How are things in Cleveland?

BRILL: Cool.

SAGAL: I want you to tell us, since we have some Clevelanders here, why it's great to be in Cleveland right now, what they're missing. Go.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BRILL: Great Lakes Brewery beer.

SAGAL: There you go. Well, thanks so much, Jason. Welcome to our show. You're going to play the game in which you have to complete the limerick. Carl will start three of them for you, each related to news of this week. Your job, finish them. Do that two times out of three, you'll be a winner. Ready to go?

BRILL: Yes.

SAGAL: Here's your limerick.

CARL KASELL, Host:

Has the circus just come into town? In Brazil it too wears the crown. And over- sized shoes are making big news. Brazil has elected a?

BRILL: Clown.

SAGAL: Yes, indeed.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: There were elections this week in Brazil.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Proud holder of the congressional seat from Sao Paulo is Francisco Everardo Oiliveira Silva, the first circus clown to serve in Brazil's government.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The first admitted circus clown to serve.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: He campaigned with the slogan, it can't get any worse and won. The Democrats in Washington seem to have taken notice of Mr. Silva's success. For example, earlier this week Joe Biden slipped on a banana peel and squirted Benjamin Netanyahu with a bottle of seltzer and then he heard about the clown.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Here is your next limerick.

KASELL: Though Neanderthals had a tough rind, in some ways they were quite refined. In their own clumsy fashion, they showed great compassion. Yes, cavemen were gentle and?

BRILL: Kind.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Now, if you're like most people, when you think Neanderthal, you think dumb club-wielding thug, but a surprising new study shows our heavy jawed ancestors had a sensitive side. It's true. Neanderthals, it turns out, had tightly bonded communities. They cared for their sick. They gave tender hugs. The scientists add that Neanderthals were good listeners. That's what they say now. It's Neanderthal society it was like, no, your arms aren't too long. Your knuckles on the ground, they make you seem grounded.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Don't worry...

CHARLIE PIERCE: No, no, that dress doesn't, make you look ape-like.

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: That brow ridge really brings out your eyes.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

TOM BODETT: How would they know that?

ROXANNE ROBERTS: It's like those studies, right?

SAGAL: They do a study.

ROBERTS: No.

SAGAL: They did it of certain genetic suppositions based on brain structure. It's, you know, they just know.

ROBERTS: But kindness, how do you know kindness?

PIERCE: They found like a really old Hallmark card.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right, here is your last limerick, Jason.

KASELL: My fingers go tappity-tap. Now my notebook will close with a snap. I need a cool breeze on my smoking knees. My computer is singeing my?

BRILL: Lap.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Ladies and gentlemen who own laptops, whatever you do, do not put them on top of your laps.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Experts have discovered more and more cases of, quote, "toasted skin syndrome."

PIERCE: Oh, God.

SAGAL: Laptops get hot and when we sit with them in our laps for hours, they're effectively toasting our skin which, unless you're a cast member on "Jersey Shore," is an uncomfortable feeling.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Experts say TSS is causes stinging rashes, permanent skin discoloration, and in rare cases, infertility, which if you are a cast member on "Jersey Shore," might not be such a bad thing.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Carl, how did Jason do on our quiz?

KASELL: Well, Jason had three correct answers, Peter, so Jason, you win our prize.

SAGAL: Well done, Jason.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

BRILL: Thank you. Can I tell all my friends now that I played Carnegie Hall?

SAGAL: Yeah, tell your friends you played Carnegie Hall.

BRILL: Thank you.

SAGAL: Tell them you got an ovation. Give him an ovation, ovation for Jason.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: That's for you, Jason.

BRILL: Thank you, New York.

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