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Falling Wine Prices Mean Deals for Consumers

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Falling Wine Prices Mean Deals for Consumers

Falling Wine Prices Mean Deals for Consumers

Falling Wine Prices Mean Deals for Consumers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1305613/1305614" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

All Things Considered's Ben Gilbert with the remains of the staff wine taste-testing experiment. David Banks, NPR Online hide caption

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David Banks, NPR Online

An overproduction of grapes in California and Europe, and a falling demand for expensive wine, have given way to tumbling wine prices. NPR's Robert Siegel and Michele Norris talk with Linda Murphy, who writes the weekly "Bargain Wine" column for the San Francisco Chronicle. Murphy says there are deals to be had.

The wines discussed were:

» Camelot California Chardonnay 2000 ($7.99)

» Pepperwood Grove Cabernet Sauvignon 2000 ($7.99)

» Jaboulet Parallel 45 Cotes du Rhone 2000 ($6.99)