All Things Bacon Sizzled At NYC's Bacon-Palooza

Bacon i i

At the Bacon-Palooza in New York's SoHo neighborhood, attendees could get everything bacon: bacon the movie, bacon the musical, bacon songs, bacon art, bacon products, and, of course, bacon food and drink. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com
Bacon

At the Bacon-Palooza in New York's SoHo neighborhood, attendees could get everything bacon: bacon the movie, bacon the musical, bacon songs, bacon art, bacon products, and, of course, bacon food and drink.

iStockphoto.com

Many fundraisers feature women in designer gowns and men in tuxes, but over the weekend in New York City's SoHo neighborhood — known for art galleries and hipsters — one gallery held a different kind of charity event: The Bacon-Palooza.

The dress was casual, the people were young, and the cause was to raise money for kids with autism.

Diet Coke with Bacon can

In this photo widely circulated on the Internet, a fake Diet Coke with Bacon can has caught bacon lovers' attention. hide caption

itoggle caption

The event had everything bacon: bacon the movie, bacon the musical, bacon songs, bacon art, bacon products, and, of course, bacon food and drink. And the people who paid $50 to get tickets to the three-day affair said bacon — not vegan — was the hippest food.

John Ordover, who runs the SoHo Gallery for Digital Art, says he decided on the bacon theme because — except for those with a religious requirement against pork — everybody he knows loves bacon. "It crossed all the social lines — rich, poor, happy, sad, outgoing, introverted," he says.  "If there is one thing that everyone can agree on, it's bacon."

There was balsamic bacon-wrapped shrimp with chipotle sauce, bacon sweet potato hash, bacon-wrapped dates, bacon dipped in chocolate — to mention a few. Then there were the drinks: a BLT with bacon vodka, tomato juice and a sprig of lettuce, and a bacon egg cream, which consisted of bacon vodka, chocolate syrup, seltzer and milk.

Attendee Danny Comer tried the egg cream. "I can't taste too much bacon-flavored vodka," he said, "but I could drink these things all night, pretty delicious."

Alla Shynkin says she even has a dog named Bacon. "This is my favorite thing in the world," she says. "I like it almost burned, and I like it rare. It's just the best food ever."

Then there are the bacon products. Keith DeCandido reels them off, starting with a book: Bacon a Love Story. "It's a heartwarming tale, or at least stomach-warming tale," he says, laughing. "We have bacon-flavored lip balm; we have Mr. Bacon's board game; we have a bacon-shaped wallet, bacon air freshener, bacon soap so you can smell like bacon."

The bacon jelly beans tasted pretty awful; the bacon-flavored popcorn was not bad at all.

Patti Stone bought Mr. Bacon's Big Adventure, a board game. "There's Wiener Wasteland and the Sausage Sea," she says. "You have to get to the Gristle Grotto, and I have a 6-year-old at home, so this is fabulous."

Mr. Bacon's Big Adventure board game

Mr. Bacon's Big Adventure board game Courtesy McPhee.com hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy McPhee.com

We won't dwell on the bacon burlesque striptease where the pasties were — you guessed it — bacon. There were Gregorian chants based on bacon recipes sung by the Sugar-Cured Singers, and there were movie clips and musical offerings. There were bacon-related cartoons and art on the walls, and since this was a gallery of digital art, it was not surprising to find Lauren Pollack with her cell phone out.

"I just texted a picture of the event to a co-worker whose wife does meat art and mostly bacon-themed art work," she said.

Kim Kindya, Ordover's partner at the gallery, said simply: "SoHo is an old Italian neighborhood." That means, "cold cuts and cured meats. New Yorkers love their corned beef, their pastrami, and their deli meats."

But Ordover, who has an 8-year-old son with autism, is perfectly willing to have another charity event for those averse to bacon — perhaps chocolate-covered tofu.

Related NPR Stories

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.