FCC Tweets Game Plays For Blacked Out Fans

New Yorkers are suffering because the Yankees lost, and because the Fox TV network continues to block its signal to three million Cablevision subscribers in the region due to a financial dispute. Last night, the FCC's Twitter feed carried updates of the other playoff game between the San Francisco Giants and the Philadelphia Phillies.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is a slender ray of hope for Yankees fans. It's not quite what you think. They're down against Texas three games to one now, but New Yorkers are also suffering because the Fox TV Network continues to block its signal to three million Cablevision subscribers in the region due to a financial dispute. Never fear - the Federal Communications Commissioner has come to the rescue. Last night, the agency's Twitter feed carried updates of the other playoff games between the San Francisco Giants and the Philadelphia Phillies, but the tweets definitely are not as good as seeing the game on TV, especially since the agency only sent four of the short messages before going to bed.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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