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Giant Fans Used As Hurricane-Force Winds

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Giant Fans Used As Hurricane-Force Winds

Strange News

Giant Fans Used As Hurricane-Force Winds

Giant Fans Used As Hurricane-Force Winds

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/130691304/130691313" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Researchers in South Carolina used 105 giant fans to create hurricane-force winds in an experiment that crumpled an ordinary home in minutes but left a better-built home standing.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Insurance researchers in South Carolina wanted to test some home designs in a hurricane, so they used giant fans to create 100-mile-per-hour winds. Within minutes the fans collapsed a conventional home. A stronger, if somewhat more expensive house did fine. There is one detail we don't know. We do not know if researchers made this test fully realistic by including a TV reporter struggling to stay upright in the wind.

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