Electronic Arts Buys Publisher Of 'Angry Birds'

Gaming giant Electronic Arts will pay nearly $20 million for Chillingo, the company that publishes Angry Birds. EA wants Chillingo's talent for spotting promising game developers, and a bigger piece of the mobile video game business.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And today's last word in business is angry birds.

(Soundbite of iPhone game, "Angry Birds")

MONTAGNE: What you're hearing is the sound from the hit iPhone game, "Angry Birds." Picture adorable cartoon birds being shot at pigs and other obstacles. Apparently the birds are angry because the pigs stole their eggs.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MONTAGNE: The 99 cent game has been near the top of the bestseller list on Apple's app store. Gaming giant Electronic Arts is going to pay nearly $20 million for Chillingo, the company that publishes "Angry Birds." Electronic Arts wants to own Chillingo's talent for spotting promising game developers, and a bigger piece of the mobile video game business.

The research firm Gartner estimates that consumers will spend more than $5 billion this year on addictive time-wasting games for their phones.

And that's the business news - let's play that - let's play those - can we get that up again?

(Soundbite of laughter)

INSKEEP: Bring up the bird. We'll just do it ourselves.

(Soundbite of bird noise)

MONTAGNE: On MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

(Soundbite of laughter)

INSKEEP: She's Renee Montagne. And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(Soundbite of music)

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