Decoding Lunar Crash Data Just over a year ago, the LCROSS mission deliberately crashed into a lunar crater, kicking up a cloud of debris --and signs of water. Michael Wargo, NASA's chief lunar scientist, describes other ingredients scientists have identified in lunar soil, a material called regolith.
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Decoding Lunar Crash Data

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Decoding Lunar Crash Data

Decoding Lunar Crash Data

Decoding Lunar Crash Data

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/130754077/130754066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Just over a year ago, the LCROSS mission deliberately crashed into a lunar crater, kicking up a cloud of debris —and signs of water. Michael Wargo, NASA's chief lunar scientist, describes other ingredients scientists have identified in lunar soil, a material called regolith.