Fla. Restaurants Vie For Big Apple's Taste In Water

New York City's water has been called the champagne of drinking waters. The Original Brooklyn Water Bagel Company in Palm Beach, Fla., developed a secret water filtration process to give its bagels that Big Apple quality. It's suing a Fla. pizzeria — accusing it of stealing the secret to the water.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

Our last word in business today is tap water. Anybody who lives in New York City learns to be proud of the local water.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

People call it the champagne of drinking waters. Some say its special polity comes from the huge reservoirs that collect the water in Upstate New York.

KELLY: Or maybe it involves the very old pipes it may travel through on the way to the faucet.

INSKEEP: Mm-hmm. In any case, some people say the water makes New York pizza and bagels taste better. And that special New York taste is at the heart of a business dispute.

KELLY: That's right. The original Brooklyn Water Bagel Company in Palm Beach, Florida, developed a secret water filtration process to give its bagels that Big Apple quality.

INSKEEP: Now it's suing a Florida pizzeria, accusing that business of stealing the secret to the water.

We're glad you're listening to your local public radio station, as tens of millions of Americans do. You can also follow us online on Facebook and on Twitter. We're @morningedition and @nprinskeep.

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

KELLY: And I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

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