Runners Lace Up Their Shoes For Charity

Marathons may be tough on the body but they are very good for charities. Ryan Lamppa, a spokesman for Running USA, says last year's road races raised $1 billion for charity. He says more than half of that came from marathons.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is a marathon year for charities.

Thousands of marathon runners are lacing up their shoes this fall. The Marine Corps Marathon is here in Washington D.C. on Sunday.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

Those 26.2 miles are tough on the body, but turns out they're very good for charities. Ryan Lamppa is a spokesman for association Running U.S.A. He says last year's road races raised a billion dollars for charity and more than half of that, he says, came from marathons.

INSKEEP: This year he thinks a record half-million marathon runners could raise even more cash.

Mr. RYAN LAMPPA (Spokesman, Running U.S.A.): When you look at the fall marathons, like Marine Corps in Chicago and New York City, they're all reporting more charities at their events, raising more money.

KELLY: Lamppa says one in five runners in the big marathons do it for a good cause.

Mr. LAMPPA: They definitely do get that double benefit of I am doing this marathon for myself but also for something bigger than me.

INSKEEP: The surge in giving comes even as most Americans report they will be donating the same or less to charity due to the bad economy.

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