N.Y.'s 'Rent Is Too Damn High' Candidate Falls Short

Jimmy McMillan's dreams of becoming governor of New York went down in flames Tuesday as Democrat Andrew Cuomo won the job. McMillan, head of the Rent Is Too Damn High Party, drew just 1 percent of the vote. But he became famous after he appeared in a gubernatorial debate. His music was played in many places, and now he's released an album. The Rent is Too Damn High, Volume 1 costs $9.99 on iTunes. Whether that's too high is up to you.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is Jimmy McMillan's next act.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

His dream of becoming governor of New York went down in flames last night. Democrat Andrew Cuomo won that job.

INSKEEP: The head of the Rent Is Too Damn High Party drew just one percent of the vote in New York State. But Mr. McMillan became famous after he appeared in a gubernatorial debate.

MONTAGNE: His music was played in many places, including here on MORNING EDITION. And yesterday, he released an album.

(Soundbite of song, "The Rent Is Too Damn High")

Mr. JIMMY MCMILLAN: (Singing) Ya'll better know about me. It's too damn high. Ain't nothing to talk about. Ain't nothing else to talk about.

MONTAGNE: It's called, as you can imagine, "The Rent Is Too Damn High: Volume 1."

(Soundbite of laughter)

MONTAGNE: And it costs $9.99 on iTunes.

INSKEEP: We'll leave it to you to decide if that's too high.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

(Soundbite of song, "The Rent Is Too Damn High")

Mr. MCMILLAN: All poor people are being run out of New York. They don't care. They don't care. They don't care. Ya'll better know about me.

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