Angle's Fans Lament Her Loss In Nev. Senate Race

Tea Party backers in Nevada who have described themselves as angry voters did not seem that angry after their candidate, Sharron Angle, was defeated Tuesday night. Pained might be a better word.

NEDA ULABY: I am Neda Ulaby. Tea Party backers here in Nevada who've described themselves as angry voters did not seem that angry after their candidate Sharron Angle was defeated. Pained might be a better word.

How would you describe the mood in there right now?

Mr. MICHAEL GARWOOD: Kind of subdued, you know.

ULABY: That's Michael Garwood, one of many Nevadans who have struggled to find work in a state with unemployment rates topping 14 percent. Like many other Republicans, he said Angle was naive, and it was just too hard to beat Harry Reid's machine. A few people even suggested the Service Employees Union tampered with ballot boxes, a source of anxiety even before the election on local right-wing blogs. Joe Mellish(ph) could hardly believe Sharron Angle actually lost.

Mr. JOE MELLISH: Well, Sharon ran a good, hard race and she has the people of Nevada at heart. I don't see the other guy with having a heart, you know. I'm sorry.

ULABY: He became teary. You'd think the general mood might have left supporters drowning their sorrows. But the ballroom bar was largely neglected. That might have pleased Sharron Angle, who once floated the notion of outlawing alcohol in Nevada.

Neda Ulaby, NPR News, Las Vegas.

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