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Profitable Again, GM Returns To Using Private Planes

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Profitable Again, GM Returns To Using Private Planes

Business

Profitable Again, GM Returns To Using Private Planes

Profitable Again, GM Returns To Using Private Planes

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/131060206/131060185" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After the government bailed out General Motors, it forced GM to sell its fleet of private jets. Executives were forced to fly commercial. Now GM is profitable and preparing to sell shares again to the public, and The New York Times reports that the company has once again started to use private planes.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And today's last word in business is General Motors ready for takeoff.

After the government bailed out the car company, it forced GM to sell its fleet of private jets. Executives were required to fly commercial. Now, GM is profitable, and preparing to sell shares again to the public. And the New York Times reports that the company has once again started to use private planes.

But for now, the charter jets are only for executives on the road show that's promoting the company's stock to potential investors.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Correction Nov. 4, 2010

An earlier version of this story suggested that GM required government approval to resume use of private planes. That was incorrect.

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