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Software Developer Scans For Climate Change Tweets

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Software Developer Scans For Climate Change Tweets

Strange News

Software Developer Scans For Climate Change Tweets

Software Developer Scans For Climate Change Tweets

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/131061410/131061488" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Software developer Nigel Leck grew tired of arguing about global warming. According to Popular Science, he made a computer program do it for him. His program scans the Twitter social network for statements that seem to deny climate change. It generates a response with links to scientific research. It isn't perfect — many messages go to people who simply comment on the weather. So the program's creator now spends time writing little apologies.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Software developer Nigel Leck grew tired of arguing about global warming. According to�Popular Science, he made a computer program to do it for him. His program scans the Twitter social network for statements that seem to deny climate change. It generates a response with links to scientific research. This isn't perfect. Many messages go to people who simply comment on the weather. So the program's creator is now spending time writing little apologies.

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