Maximum Balloon: Talking Heads Redux Although TV on the Radio's David Sitek crafted "Apartment Wrestling," his influence is cleverly and effectively concealed. The plucky guitars, the dissonant horns and David Byrne's vocals lend the track a quality so authentic, it sounds ripped right from the Talking Heads discography.
NPR logo

'Apartment Wrestling' by Maximum Balloon featuring David Byrne

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/131215857/131193152" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Maximum Balloon: Talking Heads Redux

Maximum Balloon: Talking Heads Redux

'Apartment Wrestling' by Maximum Balloon featuring David Byrne

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/131215857/131193152" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In "Apartment Wrestling," Maximum Balloon's David Sitek (pictured) gets a major assist from David Byrne. courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
courtesy of the artist

Wednesday's Pick

Song: "Apartment Wrestling"

Artist: Maximum Balloon (featuring David Byrne)

CD: Maximum Balloon

Genre: Rock

Maximum Balloon is songwriter and multi-instrumentalist David Andrew Sitek, best known as a member of TV on the Radio. Sitek has been active as a producer for years, working with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Scarlett Johansson, among others. But on his full-length solo debut as Maximum Balloon, Sitek's production talents dominate.

Although Maximum Balloon is technically a solo record, it's hardly a solo effort. Sitek enlisted the help of various musicians from his inner circle of friends and associates — among them Theophilus London, Holly Miranda and TV on the Radio bandmates Kyp Malone and Tunde Adebimpe. He custom tailored each track for each collaborator, and the result is an infectious if not fully coherent collection.

Standing out in the bunch is "Apartment Wrestling," featuring Talking Heads frontman David Byrne. Although Sitek crafted the track, his influence is cleverly and effectively concealed. The plucky guitars and dissonant horns lend "Apartment Wrestling" a quality so authentic, it sounds ripped right from the Talking Heads discography. Byrne stretches for notes in his signature style, and the words fit seamlessly into the equation, too: a little weird, shamelessly poppy and, like its groove, memorable.