iPad's Distant Ancestor — 1976 Apple One — For Sale

Christie's Auction House is planning to sell an Apple One computer, an ancestor of all those Macintosh computers around today. Many years ago, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak built the computer in Jobs' family garage. It sold in 1976 for $666.66. Now this relic may sell in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business takes us back in history.

Christie's Auction House is planning to put a computer up for sale. It's an Apple One, an ancestor of all those Macintosh computers around today. Many years ago, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak built this computer in Jobs' family garage. They considered it a leap forward in the home computer industry of the '70s because it came with a pre-assembled motherboard. You didn't have to put it together yourself.

The Apple One sold in 1976 for $666.66. Apparently they weren't superstitious. Now this relic may sell in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, and it comes in the shipping box complete with the return address of that garage in California.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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