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Folklife Festival: Scottish Invasion

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Folklife Festival: Scottish Invasion

Arts & Life

Folklife Festival: Scottish Invasion

Bagpipes, Scotch Take Root on National Mall

Folklife Festival: Scottish Invasion

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1321097/1321098" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Hamish Moore of Dunkeld, Scotland shows off his handmade pipes at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

Hamish Moore of Dunkeld, Scotland, shows off his handmade pipes at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Danielle Wagner, NPR News hide caption

toggle caption Danielle Wagner, NPR News

In the days leading up to the Fourth of July, visitors to the National Mall in Washington, D.C., were greeted by a miniature castle, a scaled down replica of the Road Hole at St. Andrews golf course, haggis burgers, barrels of aromatic single malt and the pervasive bleating of pipes.

It's all a part of the Smithsonian's annual Folklife Festival. Every year, the Smithsonian features the folk arts and traditions of a handful of countries or regions. This year, the focus is on Mali, Appalachia and Scotland. NPR's Robert Siegel, host of All Things Considered, makes a visit to the Scottish festival to report on its sights and sounds.

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