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'Long Day's Journey into Night'

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'Long Day's Journey into Night'

'Long Day's Journey into Night'

'Long Day's Journey into Night'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1334795/1334796" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Before Eugene O'Neil wrote "Long Day's Journey into Night," he'd already won three Pulitzer Prizes and a Nobel. Yet, he felt, to paraphrase the playwright, that his work was "crap." "Long Day's Journey into Night" was his response. It's been called America's greatest play and it's most often remembered as the bleak story of one night and a mother's descent into addiction. It's also about a father's relationship to his sons, and echoes O'Neil's own troubled role as a father. Caitlin Shetterly reports.