NPR logo

In Your Ear: Adonal Foyle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133839594/133839583" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
In Your Ear: Adonal Foyle

In Your Ear: Adonal Foyle

In Your Ear: Adonal Foyle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133839594/133839583" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ahead of the NBA's All Star game this weekend, poet, philanthropist and former NBA player, Adonal Foyle, shares his favorite songs, for Tell Me More's regular feature, "In Your Ear.

MICHEL MARTIN, host:

And now the feature we call In Your Ear. That's where we ask our guests about their favorite songs. And as basketball fans prepare for the NBA's all-star game this weekend, we hear from a former pro player, Adonal Foyle. Now, he was never a superstar on the court, but the teams in which he played considered him a leader for his focus and integrity.

And now that he's out of the game, Foyle can devote full attention to his other pursuits, writing poetry and mentoring young people. We caught up with former Orlando Magic and Golden State Warrior soon after his recent retirement, and now we offer you an encore of his personal playlist.

Mr. ADONAL FOYLE (Former Pro Basketball Player): Hi, everyone. My name is Adonal Foyle. I am an ex-professional basketball player for the Atlanta Magic and the Golden State Warriors.

When I am listening to anything in my car, I have Bob Marley's greatest hits. I really love having that CD. "Redemption Song," I think, is one of my favorites.

(Soundbite of song, "Redemption Song")

Mr. BOB MARLEY (Musician): (Singing) Old pirates, yes they rob I. Sold I to the merchant ships minutes after they took I

Mr. FOYLE: It always felt so very conscious. You know, emancipate yourself from mental slavery. I like the kind of things he does in his music.

(Soundbite of song, "Redemption Song")

Mr. MARLEY: (Singing) Emancipate yourself from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our mind. Have no fear for atomic energy, because none of them can stop the time. How long shall they kill our prophets while we stand aside and look?

Mr. FOYLE: And it definitely takes me back home. I feel like, you know, my mom is calling me and I'm running on the beach and listening to something like that. It takes me very much back to my roots and growing up in the Caribbean.

(Soundbite of song, "Redemption Song")

Mr. MARLEY: (Singing) Won't you have to sing these songs of freedom? Because all I ever had: redemption songs.

Mr. FOYLE: One of the other things that I like to listen to is classical music. A great piece of music - when you, every time you go to a basketball game, you hear they play, you know, this amazing music and you wonder, what is it? What is it?

(Soundbite of music, "Carmina Burana")

Mr. FOYLE: You know, I had the great opportunity to go and see "Carmina Burana" performed live and it was an absolutely amazing piece of music by Carl Orff and it just picks you up and you just have this kind of journey and it just starts building up, building up, building up, building up. Then it just absolutely explodes. I mean, to have that in your car is like, and I'd be conducting. I mean, it's just a wonderful piece of music, and seeing that live was something that I think will forever change the way I see music in general.

(Soundbite of music, "Carmina Burana")

Mr. FOYLE: Growing up in the Caribbean, one of the most important way we used to be able to communicate what's going on politically is through calypso. And one of my absolute favorite calypsonians of all time is The Mighty Sparrow. And one of his awesome songs is, you know, "Jean and Dinah."

(Soundbite of song, "Jean and Dinah")

THE MIGHTY SPARROW (Musician): (Singing) Well, it's Jean and Dinah, Rosita and Clementina, round the corner posing, bet your life is something they selling and if you catch them you can get'em all for nothing. Don't make no row, the Yankees gone, Sparrow take over now.

Mr. FOYLE: It's like, I consider myself a pretty good dancer, but you know, coming from the Caribbean, when you hear calypso, you hear something, you know, that moves you, you'll be in the car and you just start grooving, because The Mighty Sparrow, I think, has transcended music, he has been an international just superstar. But he, you know, export our culture and our way of telling stories through his calypso.

And "Jean and Dinah" is one of my absolutely favorites from The Mighty Sparrow.

(Soundbite of song, "Jean and Dinah")

THE MIGHTY SPARROW: (Singing) The Yankees gone, Sparrow take over now.

MARTIN: That was Adonal Foyle telling us what's playing in his ear. If you want to hear the full interview with the former NBA player, please go to the program page of NPR.org and select TELL ME MORE.

(Soundbite of song, "Jean and Dinah")

THE MIGHTY SPARROW: (Singing) Don't make no row, the Yankees gone, Sparrow take over now. Things bad is to hear them cry. Not a sailor in town...

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.