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'Horatio's Drive'

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'Horatio's Drive'

'Horatio's Drive'

New Book Details Epic 1903 Cross-Country Motor Trip

'Horatio's Drive'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1338700/1338869" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Horatio's Drive, book cover Alfred A. Knopf hide caption

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Alfred A. Knopf
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One hundred years ago, Horatio Nelson Jackson took up the challenge of a $50 bet and stood up for the latest trend in technology — the automobile. A Vermont native and a physician by training, Jackson agreed to undertake a cross-country drive, from San Francisco to New York City. For company, he had bicycle mechanic Sewall Crocker and a bulldog named Bud.

The story of this epic, months-long motor trip is the subject of a new book by Dayton Duncan and a documentary by Ken Burns, to air this fall on PBS. NPR's Robert Siegel, host of All Things Considered, talks with Duncan about Horatio's Drive.