Test-Tube Babies

25 Years and a Million Children Later, Questions Still Loom

The world's first test-tube baby, Louise Brown.

The world's first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, all grown up. Adrian Arbib/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Adrian Arbib/Corbis
Brown, called the miracle baby, made her debut on American television in 1979.

Brown, called the "miracle baby," made her debut on American television in 1979 on The Donahue Show. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Bettmann/Corbis

The world's first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, turns 25 this week. When in vitro fertilization was first introduced, people were alarmed about the prospect of creating embryos in the laboratory. But a million babies later, the procedure has turned out to be much safer than many imagined. However, as NPR's Joe Palca reports, scientists still aren't sure how safe the procedure is.

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